Science Spies

Credit: CC0 Public Domain The microbiome of our ancestors might have been more important for human evolution than previously thought, according to a new study published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. An adaptive gut microbiome could have been critical for human dispersal, allowing our ancestors to survive in new geographic areas. “In this paper,
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University of Nebraska-Lincoln sociologist Philip Schwadel studies the intersection between religion and politics. He recently served as a visiting senior researcher with the Pew Research Center. Credit: University Communication|University of Nebraska-Lincoln For decades, research examining the intersection of religion and politics counted the religious “nones”—or the unaffiliated—as a small, homogeneous and liberal group, and conservatives
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NASA has officially narrowed its shortlist of Discovery Program candidates down to four, serving up the tantalizing possibility that an upcoming space mission will soon be headed to Venus, Jupiter’s moon Io or Neptune’s moon Triton. Launched in 1992, the Discovery Program invites scientists and engineers to submit proposals for “small” missions centered on planetary
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Researcher Jim Elser and research technician Laura Steger taking samples of water for chemical analysis. Credit: Elser Lab/ASU The Cuatro Cienegas Basin, located in Chihuahuan Desert in Mexico, was once a shallow sea that became isolated from the Gulf of Mexico around 43 million years ago. This basin has an unusual characteristic of being particularly
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Ames Laboratory scientists took a paradoxical approach, called dynamic stabilization, by applying a terahertz electric field to drive periodic lattice oscillations in a model topological insulator. These additional fluctuations actually enhanced protected topological states. Credit: U.S. Department of Energy, Ames Laboratory Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have discovered that applying vibrational
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In the summer of 1348, the Black Death arrived in southwest England. The deadly disease rapidly swept through the country, ultimately killing between one-third and one-half of its population. Now, a team of researchers writing in the journal Antiquity has revealed new details about a mass grave of probable Black Death victims buried in the
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A NASA astronaut services the Hubble Space Telescope from orbit in 1997. Credit: NASA The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is helping find new ways to combat gender bias, according to new research from the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. Stefanie K. Johnson, associate professor at the Leeds School of Business, worked with
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Supersensitive nanomaterial. Credit: Vladimir Cherkasov et al./ACS Nano In 1900, German physician Paul Ehrlich came up with the notion of a “magic bullet.” The basic idea is to inject a patient with smart particles capable of finding, recognizing, and treating a disease. Medicine has pursued the magic bullet ever since. Russian researchers from the Moscow
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A snapping shrimp in a petri dish. The tiny critters are among the loudest animals in the ocean. Credit: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution One of the ocean’s loudest creatures is smaller than you’d expect—and will get even louder and more troublesome to humans and sea life as the ocean warms, according to new research presented
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The time-resolved nonlinear ghost imaging camera uses a nonlinear crystal to convert standard laser light to terahertz patterns, allowing the reconstruction of complex samples using a single terahertz pixel. Credit: University of Sussex A team of physicists at the University of Sussex has successfully developed the first nonlinear camera capable of capturing high-resolution images of
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Rising sea surface temperatures and acidic waters could eliminate nearly all existing coral reef habitats by 2100, suggesting restoration projects in these areas will likely meet serious challenges, according to new research presented in San Diego at the Ocean Sciences Meeting 2020. Scientists project 70 to 90 percent of coral reefs will disappear over the
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