Science Spies

Indian “gaganauts” selected for the country’s first manned space mission – Gaganyaan – in 2022 will start their training sessions at Russia’s Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center next year, a senior Russian space official said on Monday. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has said that Russia will train the Indian astronauts for India’s ambitious Gaganyaan manned space mission.
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HELSINKI — China Satcom has filed an insurance claim for the loss of the ChinaSat-18 communications satellite after failing to establish contact with the spacecraft. A claim for ChinaSat-18, which SpaceNews previously reported was insured for $250 million, has been long expected.  The ChinaSat-18 communications satellite was launched Aug. 19 atop a Long March 3B
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Micrograph of NIST’s high-resolution camera made of 1,024 sensors that count single photons, or particles of light. The camera was designed for future space-based telescopes searching for chemical signs of life on other planets. The 32-by-32 sensor array is surrounded by pink and gold wires connecting to electronics that compile the data. Credit: V. Verma/NIST
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VNIS spectra of the rock and lunar regolith measured by Yutu-2 rover. The image resolution is ~0.6 mm/pixel. Credit: Science China Press The South Pole-Aitken (SPA) is the largest and deepest basin on the Moon, theoretically opening a window into the lunar lower crust and likely into the upper mantle. However, compositional information of the
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Intensity distribution of an electric wave field that applies a well-defined torque onto the quadratic target. Credit: TU Wien Atoms, molecules or even living cells can be manipulated with light beams. At TU Wien a method was developed to revolutionize such “optical tweezers”. They are reminiscent of the “tractor beam” in Star Trek: Special light
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Credit: European Space Agency A recent “deep learning” algorithm—despite having no innate knowledge of solar physics—could provide more accurate predictions of how the sun affects our planet than current models based on scientific understanding. For decades, people have tried to predict the impact of the sun on our planet’s atmosphere. Up until now, algorithms based
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Researchers review recent work on understanding the behavior of con Willebrand factor in APL Bioengineering, painting a portrait of vWF, and by highlighting advances in the field, the authors put forth promising avenues for therapies in controlling these proteins.Multiscale modeling of complex blood flow through a microvessel. Credit: Zixiang Liu Blood clots have long been
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Simulations showing cancerous multiple myeloma cells, also known as cCPCs, getting stuck between micropillars in a new filter device, described in Biomicrofluidics. Blue outline is the cCPC and fluid is flowing is from top to bottom. Credit: Lidan You, University of Toronto Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer in which malignant plasma cells,
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With the polarization of America’s media and politics reaching a fever pitch, many news consumers—”worn out by a fog of political news,” as a recent New York Times feature put it – are responding by tuning out altogether. Media distrust, which has intensified globally in recent years, is also a likely factor. A recent Gallup
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The research is featured as a hot paper and has also been selected as the journal’s cover illustration. Credit: Wiley Scientists from Trinity have created a suite of new biological sensors by chemically re-engineering pigments to act like tiny Venus flytraps. The sensors are able to detect and grab specific molecules, such as pollutants, and
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain A landmark study into youth crime is launching a new phase to better understand how experience of offending in childhood impacts on later life. More than 4000 people who took part in the influential Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime 20 years ago will be asked to join new research
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This is a mosaic image of asteroid Bennu, from NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft. The discovery of sugars in meteorites supports the hypothesis that chemical reactions in asteroids – the parent bodies of many meteorites – can make some of life’s ingredients. Credit: NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona www.nasa.gov/press-release/god … sugars-in-meteorites An international team has found sugars essential to
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain An international team of researchers has found that people in space for long durations can experience blood flowing in the wrong direction in the jugular vein. In their paper published on JAMA Network Open, the group describes their study of blood flow in astronauts. As astronauts have come to spend longer
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