Science Spies

More than 40,000 years ago, the landscape of southwestern Australia was replete with giant kangaroos. One of these extinct kangaroos, known as a short-faced kangaroo, boasted a single-toed clawed foot (modern-day roos have three toes), weighed more than 260 pounds (118 kilograms), and munched on plants. According to a new study published in the journal
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A fifty-year-old hypothesis predicting the existence of bodies dubbed Generic Objects of Dark Energy (GEODEs) is getting a second look in light of a proposed correction to assumptions we use to model the way our Universe expands. If this new version of a classic cosmological model is correct, some black holes could hide cores of pure
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The region at the centre of our galaxy is still full of mysteries, but astronomers have just found a clue to its past: Huge, radio-emitting bubbles, extending 700 light-years either side of the galactic plane. They could be, the researchers believe, the result of a huge eruption from our galaxy’s supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*.
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  On March 11, 2011, Japan was struck by the most powerful earthquake in the nation’s history – a magnitude 9 temblor that triggered a tsunami with waves up to 133 feet (40 meters) high. The disaster set off three nuclear meltdowns and three hydrogen explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Eight years
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Indonesia’s forest fires are an annual problem but have been worsened this year by particularly dry weather, and in recent days sent toxic smog floating over Malaysia and triggered a diplomatic row More The number of blazes in Indonesia’s rainforests has jumped sharply, satellite data showed Thursday, spreading smog across Southeast Asia and adding to
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain More For years, scientists have explored ways to alter the cells of microorganisms in efforts to improve how a wide range of products are made—including medicines, fuels, and even beer. By tapping into the world of metabolic engineering, researchers have also developed techniques to create “smart” bacteria capable of carrying out
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By 2100, 96% of the global population may not have sufficient access to a naturally occurring essential brain-building omega-3 fatty acid, according to a study in the journal Ambio. Global warming may reduce the availability of Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the most abundant fatty acid found in mammalian brains, which has a crucial role in processes
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PARIS – Iceye released the first images Sept. 12 from new synthetic aperture radar satellites launched in July and began offering commercial access to its three-satellite constellation. “Iceye SAR satellite constellation is soon becoming the largest of its kind in the world,” Rafal Modrzewski, Iceye CEO and co-founder, said in a statement. “In addition to
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New research shows that the presence of microplastics can stunt the growth of earthworms, and even cause them to lose weight — potentially having a serious impact on the soil ecosystem. The study, to be published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, is the first to measure the effects of microplastics on endogeic worms,
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An update on our mission to the Sun, preparations continue for Orion’s upcoming flight test, and a science chat about two upcoming out-of-this-world encounters … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA! This video is available for download from NASA’s Image and Video Library: https://images.nasa.gov/details-NHQ_2018_1109_Parker%20Solar%20Probe%20%E2%80%9CA-okay%E2%80%9D%20After%20Close%20Solar%20Approach%20on%20This%20Week%20@NASA%20%E2%80%93%20November%209,%202018.html Join us on
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A drone flies over the Amazon, collecting samples of volatile organic compounds while smoke from a biomass fire can be seen in the distance. Credit: Jianhuai Ye/ Harvard SEAS More In 2017, Scot Martin, the Gordon McKay Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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