Biology

Seed-coated pesticides, such as neonicotinoids, are increasingly used in the major field crops, but are underreported, in part, because farmers often do not know what pesticides are on their seeds, according to an international team of researchers. Credit: Alyssa Collins Pesticide-coated seeds—such as neonicotinoids, many of which are highly toxic to both pest and beneficial
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New fossil specimen helped University of Kansas graduate student Anna Whitaker solve a 50-year-old marine-worm mystery. Credit: Anna Whitaker, et al. When a partial fossil specimen of a primordial marine worm was unearthed in Utah in 1969, scientists had a tough go identifying it. Usually, such worms are recognized and categorized by the arrangement of
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Using musical scores to code the structure and folding of proteins composed of amino acids, each of which vibrates with a unique sound. Credit: Markus J. Buehler Proteins are the building blocks of life, and consequently, scientists have long studied how they can improve proteins and design completely new proteins that perform new functions and
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These are Japanese medaka fish used in a new study that found microplastic fibers cause severe cell damage and possible hormonal changes. Fibers of polyester, polypropylene and other types of plastics are shed or washed off of synthetic textiles used in clothing and other consumer and industrial products, entering waterways. Credit: Melissa Chernick, Duke University
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Golf course in the Ogden, Utah area with wildlife warnings posted. Outdoor lighting can influence animal movement, behavior, and habitat use – especially along the urban-wildland interface. Credit: David Stoner/Utah State University A new paper including research from a Utah State University scientist provides a framework for understanding how light and noise pollution affects wildlife.
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A fold (shape) that may have been one of the earliest proteins in the evolution of metabolism. Credit: Vikas Nanda/Rutgers University Rutgers researchers have discovered the origins of the protein structures responsible for metabolism: simple molecules that powered early life on Earth and serve as chemical signals that NASA could use to search for life
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Mixed-charge nanoparticles for destabilizing cancer lysosomes and selective killing of cancer cells. Histograms in the bottom row show that mixed-charge nanoparticles selectively kill thirteen cancer cell lines (histogram on the right), while not harming four normal epithelial or fibroblast cell types/lines (histogram on the left). Credit: IBS A team of researchers from the Center for
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Mexico’s forests this winter received 53% fewer monarch butterflies, a species that migrates south from Canada and the United States, according to figures published this week. Environmental organization World Wildlife Federation said that in the November-to-March season, monarch butterflies occupied 2.83 hectares of forests in the states of Michoacan and Mexico,
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Etlatongo ballplayer figurine. One of numerous ceramic ballplayers from the termination event, front view shows a thick belt or yoke with a loincloth project from it, while the profile view illustrates broken tripod support at bottom, which allowed the figurine to stand, and whistle chamber above it. Credit: Blomster and Salazar Chávez, Sci. Adv. 2020;
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Researchers at Chalmers have developed a new synthetic rubber-like material with a unique combination of properties. The material could be suitable for applications in various medical devices for supporting or replacing human tissue. The 3D printed ‘nose’ in the image is an example of how the material could act as a possible replacement for cartilage.
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By tracking the growth of a biofilm with super-resolution imaging, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine found similarities in how it formed that mimicked how urbanization occurs. Credit: Geelsu Hwang/University of Pennsylvania Microbiologists have long adopted the language of human settlement to describe how bacteria live and grow: They “invade” and
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University of Montana associate professor Jedediah Brodie recently published a paper detailing a major conservation success in the Malaysian state of Sabah, where Brodie and a team of scientists worked to increase the state’s rainforest protection. Photo courtesy of Brodie Credit: Jedediah Brodie Jedediah Brodie has spent a career tromping around tropical rainforests, conducting on-the-ground
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain New research into the evolutionary history and prehistoric migrations of hyenas reveals surprising similarities between hyenas and prehistoric humans. The results from the University of Copenhagen and University of Potsdam also indicate that humans had a detrimental effect on hyena populations about 100,000 years ago. Prehistoric humans left Africa for the
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