Biology

Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Texas A&M University and the University of Georgia may have discovered a way to treat deadly foal pneumonia without promoting multi-drug resistant bacteria. In a clinical trial, they found that gallium maltolate (GaM), a semi-metal compound with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, could be a viable alternative to overprescribed antibiotics. The
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Credit: Lilla Frerichs/public domain Bees are excellent dancers. When a forager bee alights upon an Eden of pollen and nectar, it goes home to tell its hive mates. The greater the intensity of the dance, the richer the source of food being indicated. In Minnesota, more bees are going to be dancing intensely this spring.
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Researchers sequenced the genomes of three hornworts, including this Anthoceros agrestis. These ancient plants hold evolutionary secrets that could help crops grow more efficiently with less fertilizer. Credit: Eftychis Frangedakis Some 500 million years ago—when our continents were likely connected in a single land mass and most life existed underwater—hornworts were one of the first
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Arabidopsis thaliana, a small flowering plant in the mustard family. Credit: Salk Institute Just like humans and other animals, plants have hormones. One role of plant hormones is to perceive trouble—whether an insect attack, drought or intense heat or cold—and then signal to the rest of the plant to respond. A multicenter team led by
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Individual XVIII teeth from la Sima de los Huesos. Credit: (Atapuerca)/M. Modesto-Mata/CENIEH The CENIEH has conducted the first study which tackles counting the two types of enamel growth lines, in Lower Pleistocene and Middle Pleistocene populations in Europe. The data obtained in this research, together with those from other studies under way, could constitute the
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Edamame in the field. Credit: Marty Williams Edamame may be a niche crop in the United States, but growers and processors still need the best possible information to make sound management decisions. That’s why USDA Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) and University of Illinois researchers are making new plant density recommendations for machine-harvested edamame, at less
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Preserved specimens. Image by Merryjack, Flickr. The discoloured fish that rest in glass jars in museums across the world are normally used by specialists as references to study the traits that identify certain species. But a new study proposes an additional use for such ‘samples.’ Published in the Journal of Applied Ichthyology, the paper suggests
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Damage (red devils) like drying out, harsh chemicals or heat normally causes proteins to become unstable and lose their proper shape and function (left side, orange). Researchers at the University of Tokyo have characterized Hero proteins (pink, purple, green), long, flexible proteins that protect other proteins (right side, orange). Credit: Kotaro Tsuboyama, CC BY 4.0
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A schematic shows the three-step method to produce molecular-imprinted graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets. The process developed by Rice University researchers could help catch and kill free-floating antibiotic resistant genes found in secondary effluent produced by wastewater plants. Credit: Danning Zhang/Rice University It’s not enough to take antibiotic-resistant bacteria out of wastewater to eliminate the risks
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A White’s seahorse hiding in its natural coral cauliflower habitat. Credit: Dr David Harasti Endangered Australian seahorses are thriving in new habitats that act like underwater hotels. International species may also be saved by trial “seahorse hotels” in Europe, the United States and Southeast Asia. Venture beneath the ocean and you’ll see schools of fish
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The amyloid-beta peptide accumulates to amyloid fibrils that build up dense amyloid plaques. Credit: selvanegra. Credit: iStock photos EPFL scientists have developed powerful tools to unmask the diversity of amyloid fibrils, which are associated with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The scientists made the breakthrough by developing gold nanoparticles that combine with cryogenic transmission
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Left, drawing of a tablet found at the site. Right, a digital 3-D model. Credit: Stephen Houston (Brown University)/Charles Golden (Brandeis) Associate professor of anthropology Charles Golden and his colleagues have found the long-lost capital of an ancient Maya kingdom in the backyard of a Mexican cattle rancher. Golden, in collaboration with Brown University bioarchaeologist
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The OI began archaeological expeditions to the ancient city of Persepolis in the 1930s, where they uncovered tens of thousands clay tablets containing cuneiform. A collaboration between the OI and the Department of Computer Science using a machine learning program could allow faster translation of these tablets. Credit: the OI Twenty-five centuries ago, the “paperwork”
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Credit: Northwestern University Northwestern University researchers have mapped a group of proteins that play a critical role in both gene expression and repairing damaged DNA. By understanding this protein complex, called SWI/SNF, researchers hope to better understand how cancer arises. SWI/SNF regulates the structure of chromatin, which comprises genetic material in a cell’s nucleus and
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain A group of scientists from NUST MISIS has presented the test results of an innovative oncotherapy technology based on hyperthermia—heating nanoparticles that have been introduced into a tumour to kill it. A drug based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles cured 100% of the mice with intestinal cancer from the experimental group. Project
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Greek Meadow Viper (Vipera graeca) on Tymfi Mountain in Greece. Credit: Edvárd Mizsei Climate change is a key factor contributing to the likely extinction of the Greek Meadow Viper, a new study has found. Researchers, working on behalf of the Centre for Ecological Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, stated the probability of elimination was ‘extremely
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