Biology

Formation & maintenance of the endosomes are governed by a newly discovered cellular mechanism. Credit: Tokyo University of Science Body cells are workshops that continuously operate to produce and process substances to maintain metabolism. When a substance enters a cell for processing, it is surrounded by a portion of the cell’s outer membrane to form
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University of Delaware doctoral student Emily Berckman (left) and Prof. Wilfred Chen have found a new way to use CRISPR technology that will help chemists, biochemists and engineers working on such things as pharmaceuticals and biofuels. Credit: University of Delaware More In a classic episode of an old-school TV comedy called I Love Lucy, we
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Credit: Communications Chemistry More Two pathways diverged in a chemical synthesis, and one molecule took them both. Chemists at the University of Tokyo have studied how molecular building blocks can either form a spherical cage or an ultrathin sheet that shows some of the basic properties of a “smart” material that can respond to its
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Chaotic mobs of jackdaws suddenly get organised once enough birds join in, new research shows. Credit: Alex Thornton More Chaotic mobs of jackdaws suddenly get organised once enough birds join in, new research shows. The birds form mobs to drive away predators near their nests, and are initially disordered. But the new study, by biologists
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Grosskurth et al. assess a two-step task commonly used to study people’s decision-making behaviors. Credit: Jon Tyson, unsplash. More A two-step task commonly used to study people’s decision-making behaviors does not appear to be effective for training people to rely more on goal-oriented behaviors and less on habitual behaviors. Elmar Grosskurth of Inselspital University Hospital
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain More Scientists have reported a new approach to treating lung cancer with inhaled nanoparticles developed at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health. In this proof of concept study, Dawen Zhao, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of biomedical engineering at Wake Forest School of Medicine, used a mouse
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Deportees after the Assyrian siege of Lachish, Judea (701 B.C.E.). Detail from bas-relief removed from Sennacherib’s ‘Palace Without Rival,’ Nineveh, Iraq, and now in The British Museum. Credit: The British Museum The Neo-Assyrian Empire, centered in northern Iraq and extending from Iran to Egypt—the largest empire of its time—collapsed after more than two centuries of
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The vast part of the research related to the synthesis of target compounds was carried out by Polina Smirnova — a Ph.D. student of the Department of organic chemistry in SNS FEFU. Credit: FEFU press office Chemists from Far Eastern Federal University’s School of Natural Sciences (SNS FEFU) have developed a new method to synthesize
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Alpine rock axehead found at Harras, Thuringia, from the Michelsberg Culture (c. 4300-2800 ANE). Credit: Juraj Lipták, State Office for Heritage Management and Archaeology Saxony-Anhalt. Axeheads made out of Alpine rock had strong social and economic symbolic meaning in the Neolithic, given their production and use value. Their resistance to friction and breakage, which permitted
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Ashurbanipal, last major ruler of the Assyrian Empire, couldn’t outrun the effects of climate change. Credit: British Museum, CC BY-ND Ancient Mesopotamia, the fabled land between the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers, was the command and control center of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. This ancient superpower was the largest empire of its time, lasting from 912
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Adam Schneider during fieldwork in Jordan. Credit: Adam Schneider/CIRES More New research suggests it was climate-related drought that built the foundation for the collapse of the Assyrian Empire (whose heartland was based in today’s northern Iraq)—one of the most powerful civilizations in the ancient world. The Science Advances paper, led by Ashish Sinha at California
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain More Scientists at the University of Birmingham have unravelled the genetic mechanisms behind tiny waterfleas’ ability to adapt to increased levels of phosphorus pollution in lakes. By mapping networks of genes to the physiological responses of ancient and modern waterfleas (Daphnia), the researchers, based in the University’s School of Biosciences, were
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