Biology

Cometary impacts can produce complex carbon-rich prebiotic materials from simple organic precursors such as the amino acid glycine. Credit: Liam Kraus/LLNL Comets screaming through the atmosphere of early Earth at tens of thousands of miles per hour likely contained measurable amounts of protein-forming amino acids. Upon impact, these amino acids self-assembled into significantly larger nitrogen-containing
0 Comments
Asst. Prof. Maanasa Raghavan, a geneticist at UChicago who started an ancient DNA lab, extracts and sequences genomes from skeletal remains of ancient individuals. Credit: Paola González Carvajal Archaeologists learn about the past by piecing together artifacts from material culture: the tools, artwork and architecture left behind that tell us how ancient humans lived. But
0 Comments
Size matters: EMcapsulins as genetically expressed and multiplexed gene reporters for Electron Microscopy. Credit: Barth van Rossum Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen have developed a method to visualize gene expression of cells with an electron microscope. Although electron microscopy currently provides the most detailed look into cells, it cannot differentiate which genetic programs run inside
0 Comments
Lichens in Taiwan. The lichens alive today largely evolved and flourished in the time following the extinction of the dinosaurs. Credit: (c) Jen-Pan Huang When an asteroid smacked into the Earth 66 million years ago, it triggered mass extinctions all over the planet. The most famous victims were the dinosaurs, but early birds, insects, and
0 Comments
Life reconstructions of extinct crocodyliforms. Differences in tooth shape are related to differences in diets. Credit: Jorge Gonzalez Based on careful study of fossilized teeth, scientists Keegan Melstom and Randall Irmis at the Natural History Museum of Utah at the University of Utah have found that multiple ancient groups of crocodyliforms—the group including living and
0 Comments
The waters off the eastern Mediterranean island of Cyprus have proved rich for archaeological investigation in recent years Cyprus has found its first undisturbed Roman shipwreck complete with ancient cargo off its southern coast, the antiquities department said Thursday, noting the discovery could illuminate regional trading history. “The site is a wreck of a Roman
0 Comments
Confocal overview of a TaEPF1 OE wheat leaf showing epidermal layer (purple), subtending mesophyll cells (green), a stomate (St) consisting of guard cells and associated subsidiary cells and, in the same file, an arrested stomatal precursor. Credit: University of Sheffield Scientists have discovered how plants create networks of air channels—the lungs of the leaf—to transport
0 Comments
Graphic depiction of the process of using cobalt- and manganese-doped nanoparticles to kill tumors via magnetic hyperthermia. Credit: Tetiana Korzun Researchers at Oregon State University have developed an improved technique for using magnetic nanoclusters to kill hard-to-reach tumors. Magnetic nanoparticles—tiny pieces of matter as small as one-billionth of a meter—have shown anti-cancer promise for tumors
0 Comments
Credit: ACS Medical advancements can come at a physical cost. Often following diagnosis and treatment for cancer and other diseases, patients’ organs and cells can remain healed but damaged from the medical condition. In fact, one of the fastest growing medical markets is healing and/or replacing organs and cells already treated, yet remain damaged by
0 Comments
Dopamine neurons in the mushroom body, pictured here, convey reward signals in the fly brain. Credit: Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Behavior at The Rockefeller University As animals explore their environment, they learn to master it. By discovering what sounds tend to precede predatorial attack, for example, or what smells predict dinner, they develop a kind
0 Comments
Credit: NASA Archaeologists working in two Italian caves have discovered some of the earliest known examples of ancient humans using an adhesive on their stone tools—an important technological advance called “hafting.” The new study, which included CU Boulder’s Paola Villa, shows that Neanderthals living in Europe from about 55 to 40 thousand years ago traveled
0 Comments
The archaeological site of ‘Ein Qashish in northern Israel was a place of repeated Neanderthal occupation and use during the Middle Paleolithic, according to a study released June 26, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ravid Ekshtain of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and colleagues. Credit: Ekshtain, 2019 The archaeological site of ‘Ein
0 Comments