Biology

Researcher Isaac Dell collected hourly temperature data along with more than 70,000 insects across the 2017 and 2018 growing seasons. Credit: Karina Puikkonen/Colorado State University If the climate continues warming as predicted, spruce beetle outbreaks in the Rocky Mountains could become more frequent, a new multi-year study led by Colorado State University finds. While insect
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The United States is seeing an increase in the number of neurological diseases. Stroke is ranked as the fifth leading cause of death, with Alzheimer’s being ranked sixth. Another neurological disease—Parkinson’s—affects nearly 1 million people in the U.S. each year. Implantable neurostimulation devices are a common way to treat some of these diseases. One of
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The roadmap for synthetic or engineering biology identifies five research areas that the federal government needs to invest in to fuel the bioeconomy and keep the US at the forefront of the field. Credit: Engineering Biology Research Consortium, UC Berkeley Genetically engineered trees that provide fire-resistant lumber for homes. Modified organs that won’t be rejected.
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Artistic reconstruction of a gregarious community of Ernietta. Credit: Dave Mazierski Earth’s first dinner party wasn’t impressive, just a bunch of soft-bodied Ediacaran organisms sunk into sediment on the ocean floor, sharing in scraps of organic matter suspended in the water around them. But sorting out the way the 570-540-million-year-old, enigmatic creatures ate supports the
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Selection of the Early Celtic vessels held in the archive of the Württemberg State Museum. Credit: Victor S. Brigola Early Celts in eastern France imported Mediterranean pottery, as well as olive oil and wine, and may have appropriated Mediterranean feasting practices, according to a study published June 19, 2019 in PLOS ONE, by Maxime Rageot
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Credit: American Chemical Society The sweet, starchy orange sweet potatoes are tasty and nutritious ingredients for fries, casseroles and pies. Although humans have been cultivating sweet potatoes for thousands of years, scientists still don’t know much about the protein makeup of these tubers. In ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research, researchers have analyzed the proteome of
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Vesamicol derivatives, in which alkyl chains of varying chain lengths were introduced between a piperazine ring and a benzene ring, were synthesized and evaluated. Screening of the binding affinity of these vesamicol derivatives for the sigma-1 receptor was performed. The radioiodine labeled probe [I-125]2-(4-(3-(4-iodophenyl)propyl)piperazin-1-yl)cyclohexan-1-ol was prepared and evaluated in in vitro and in vivo. Credit:
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Metabolic engineering for the production of free fatty acids (FFAs), fatty acid ethyl esters  (FAEEs), and long-chain hydrocarbons (LCHCs) in Rhodococcus opacus PD630. Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel, with one-step direct fermentative production. Credit: KAIST Researchers
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*Early species similar to the modern crocodile, pictured above, were sensitive to weather changes and could help scientists understand ancient climate changes Credit: Canva Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate, according to new findings published in the Journal of Vertebrate
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Most Prothonotary Warblers spend the winter in a small, ecologically and politically fragile area of Colombia. Credit: Joan Eckhardt Many of North America’s migratory songbirds, which undertake awe-inspiring journeys twice a year, are declining at alarming rates. For conservation efforts to succeed, wildlife managers need to know where they go and what challenges they face
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John Day, Distinguished Professor Emeritus in LSU’s College of the Coast & Environment, has collaborated on a new analysis of societal development with Joel Gunn of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, William Folan of the Universidad Autonoma de Campeche in Mexico, and Matthew Moerschbaecher of the Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinators Office. Gunn and
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Centrosaurus, the Triceratops relative whose bones contained modern microbes. Credit: Nobu Tamura Bad news, Jurassic Park fans—the odds of scientists cloning a dinosaur from ancient DNA are pretty much zero. That’s because DNA breaks down over time and isn’t stable enough to stay intact for millions of years. And while proteins, the molecules in all
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Polypeptide formation by the oxidative reaction of amino thioacids. (a) Amino thioacids 1 and 2 are coupled via a diaminoacyl disulfide intermediate and subsequent intramolecular amide formation generates an alpha-amide bond. Iron ore or Fe2O3 in acidic solution accelerates this polypeptide formation. The repetitive performance of this reaction yields the polypeptide. (b) The polypeptide is
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(A) Figure describes the enhanced photo-thermal responses of aggregated gold nanoparticles. (B) Aptamer-modified gold nanospheres displaying high selectivity in specific targeting of human prostate cancer cells over normal human prostate epithelial cells (green circles). (C) Figure shows selective photo-thermal imaging of cancer cells. (D) Figure shows the damaged cancer cells after photo-thermal treatment. Credit: Journal
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Credit: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich DNA may have appeared on Earth earlier than has hitherto been assumed. LMU chemists led by Oliver Trapp show that a simple reaction pathway could have given rise to DNA subunits on the early Earth. How were the building-blocks of life first formed on the early Earth? As yet,
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