History

Atlanta is dotted with controversial monuments to the Confederacy and its heroes. Activists and public officials have long wanted to see these memorials taken down, but restrictive state laws make it virtually impossible to do so. Now, the city is trying a different approach: As Rosalind Bentley reports for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta is installing
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In 1970, the Indian government planned to flood 8.3 square kilometers of pristine evergreen tropical forest by building a hydroelectric plant to provide power and jobs to the state of Kerala. And they would have succeeded—if it weren’t for a burgeoning people’s science movement, buttressed by a pioneering female botanist. At 80 years old, Janaki
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A 10th-century grave in Denmark was long thought to contain the bones of a warrior believed to be a Viking woman. But a new analysis of the grave, located on the island of Langeland, suggests that the warrior wasn’t Viking, but rather Slavic, likely from the area of present-day Poland. Researcher Leszek Gardeła was researching
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A hand-wringing bankruptcy auction put the fate of one of the most significant collections of 20th-century photographs documenting the African-American experience up in the air. More than 4 million prints and negatives that make up the storied legacy of the Johnson Publishing Company, the parent company of essential black publications, including Ebony and Jet, were
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Francis Gary Powers had his first polygraph experience right after signing up as a pilot for the CIA’s U-2 program in January 1956. In his memoir, Powers described being called into a room where he was confronted with the question, “Any objection to taking a lie detector test?” Though I had a great many, I
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For many years, the Lithuanian capital of Vilna—known today as Vilnius—was a hub of Jewish religious and cultural life. There were centers of Torah learning, private schools, Jewish presses and theater organizations. Jewish writers and poets lived there, as did esteemed rabbis—most notably the Vilna Gaon, a famed scholar of the 18th century. In the
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Since its launch in 2012, the Great Pompeii Project has unearthed finds including mythological frescoes, a “fast food” counter, a preserved horse still in its harness, and a charcoal inscription suggesting Mount Vesuvius erupted in October of 79 A.D.—two months later than has long been believed. These discoveries have helped archaeologists paint a clearer portrait
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