Humans

Luis Martinez-Lemus (right) discusses research findings with Lauren Park (left) and Jaume Padilla at the University of Missouri’s Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center. Credit: University of Missouri First be a human, then be a scientist. As social beliefs and values change over time, scientists have struggled with effectively communicating the facts of their research with the
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Cybercriminal phenomena seem to have caught society and authorities unprepared and off guard. As a quick response to explain the phenomena, research has tried to transfer existing theories and solutions about crime and deviant human behavior from the physical world to cyberspace. Manja Nikolovska’s dissertation from the University of Jyväskylä first identifies and elaborates major
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Women-focused capital financing is supposedly aimed at ending the corporate gender gap. But many equity investors, still largely high-net-worth men, still view women entrepreneurs as being deficient — and are practising what’s known as pinkwashing. Credit: Shutterstock An increase in the number of women-focused capital funds promises to help address gender gaps in the provision
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University of Nebraska-Lincoln sociologist Philip Schwadel studies the intersection between religion and politics. He recently served as a visiting senior researcher with the Pew Research Center. Credit: University Communication|University of Nebraska-Lincoln For decades, research examining the intersection of religion and politics counted the religious “nones”—or the unaffiliated—as a small, homogeneous and liberal group, and conservatives
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A NASA astronaut services the Hubble Space Telescope from orbit in 1997. Credit: NASA The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is helping find new ways to combat gender bias, according to new research from the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. Stefanie K. Johnson, associate professor at the Leeds School of Business, worked with
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Competitive behavior among employees may be triggered by the type of feedback they have received. These are the findings of a study conducted by the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the IESE Business School in Barcelona. The results have been published in the Journal of Behavioral Decision Making. Feedback
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Credit: Brandon Martin The federal flood buyout program disproportionally benefits at-risk homes in the whitest communities of America’s largest cities, according to a study from sociologists at Rice University. “Racial Inequities in Federal Buyouts of Flood-Prone Homes: A Nationwide Assessment of Environmental Adaptation” is now available in the online edition of Socius. It provides the
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Police use of lethal force in the United States has triggered public scrutiny of violent interactions between police and citizens. Past research has focused on whether race and levels of violence contribute to this phenomenon. A new study expands on prior research by examining the impact of the availability of firearms. It finds a pronounced
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Detainees try to support each other, but it’s not easy. Credit: tuaindeed/Shutterstock The British Home Office has received heavy criticism in recent weeks after it emerged people held in immigration detention centers were struggling to access mobile phone reception and could not reach lawyers to challenge their imminent deportation. In the year to June 2019,
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Credit: Emmy Jonsson and Pixabay Over 1.3 million people die in traffic accidents every year. Consequently, traffic accidents are the most common cause of death in certain age groups. The world’s experts are now gathering in Stockholm to discuss new UN goals for road safety, developed under the leadership of Chalmers professor Claes Tingvall. Transports and
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Credit: Birmingham City University A third of construction professionals believe the industry still has ‘inadequate’ knowledge and training around fire safety in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster, new research has found. A study carried out by Iman Farah Mohamed, a Quantity Surveying student at Birmingham City University, looked at industry views on fire
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain The rise of fake news could be making disease outbreaks worse—according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). Researchers focused on influenza, monkeypox and norovirus across two studies—but they say their findings could also be useful for dealing with the COVID-19 Coronavirus outbreak. The team say that efforts
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain ‘Tacky’ and ‘kitsch’ religious souvenirs brought back from pilgrimage sites offer pilgrims and their friends and family who cannot make the journey a deeper religious connection. Research by Dr. Leighanne Higgins, of Lancaster University, and Dr. Kathy Hamilton, of the University of Strathclyde, published in the Annals of Tourism Research, studied
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