Humans

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Dutch judges feel that multi-judge panels can lead to more carefully considered rulings. Although research by Reyer Baas shows that they may be right, the added value of collective decision-making is far from guaranteed. Baas will receive his Ph.D. from Radboud University on January 24th. The Dutch judicial system is currently
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America’s prison populations are disproportionately filled with people of color, but prosecutors’ biases toward defendants’ race and class may not be the primary cause for those disparities, new research from the University of Arizona suggests. The finding, which comes from a unique study involving hundreds of prosecutors across the U.S., counters decades’ worth of previous
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Plants in the office. Credit: Lauren Mulligan | www.wits.ac.za/curiosity/ Plants in the office are not there just to look pretty. They can lead to increased productivity, as well as improved mental health for workers. We all know that taking a walk in the garden or going for a run in the park after work can
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Organized cybercrime differs from other types of criminal networks — making trails to track them more challenging. Credit: Mika Baumeister on Unsplash Does the common stereotype for “organized crime” hold up for organizations of hackers? Research from Michigan State University is one of the first to identify common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these
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The researchers from Münster and Bielefeld emphasize that attention and trust towards juvenile offenders are often more effective than harsh sentences. Credit: Papaioannou Kostas – Unsplash Although coming from a disadvantaged background, experiencing violence within the family, having a negative school environment or consuming violent media such as films and computer games have little or
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Fabrizio Perretti, Bocconi University, co-author. Credit: Paolo Tonato According to received wisdom, local activism against the establishment of industrial plants follows a cycle, with its highest intensity a short time after mobilization. If a firm stands, activism is destined to fade away. New research published in the Strategic Management Journal suggests we should think again.
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Far-right agitators in Portugal now have different reasons to their 1970s predecessors for becoming radicalised and committing acts of political violence—a new study shows. Influenced by the international ‘skinhead’ movement from the mid-1980s, current extremists drawn largely from the working classes have turned to violence to ‘protect’ white Portugal and Europe against the ‘threat’ posed
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Violence against women and girls in South Africa is now recognized as a national crisis. Far too many women and girls experience violence, primarily from their intimate partners. The latest Demographic and Health Survey, a nationally representative survey across South Africa, led by the South African Medical Research Council in 2016,
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U of A undergraduate student Bryce Wittrock (left) and linguist Ben Tucker analyze a waveform from a recording for their study comparing dialects among people in southern Alberta, southern Saskatchewan and Edmonton. Credit: Geoff McMaster It’s only a 40-minute drive from Queens to the Bronx in New York, but the difference in dialect is obvious
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“He [God] does not play dice,” quipped Albert Einstein, but for mortals chance is part of life. We cannot experience, measure and predict with absolute certainty. We may win a prize in a Christmas raffle. There’s also a small but real chance of being struck by lightning. Statistics enables understanding of numerical data, including probabilities.
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Associate Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences Susan Fredricks (left) and Assistant Teaching Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences Joshua Phillips recently presented research at the 18th Cross Cultural Research Conference, held in Puerto Rico. Credit: Joshua Phillips Higher levels of engagement in the political process may make citizens more willing to follow laws, according
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Credit: McGill University New research from McGill University and the University of California, Santa Cruz has found that the local streets of the world’s cities are becoming less connected, a global trend that is driving urban sprawl and discouraging the use of public transportation. The new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of
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A new study led by School of Public and International Affairs faculty member Ralph Buehler used National Household Travel Surveys from 2001 and 2017 to estimate frequency, duration, and distance of walking and cycling per capita. The research suggests the locations that have benefited most from federal spending to increase active transportation are large urban
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