Humans

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Women’s educational attainment has increased tremendously and even exceeded men’s all over the world in the late 20th century. China’s One-Child Policy had a beneficial effect on women’s education and explains about half of the increase in educational attainment for women born between 1960-1980, according to a review published in Contemporary
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Credit: Australian Navy This summer’s bushfires were not just devastating events in themselves. More broadly, they highlighted the immense vulnerability of the systems which make our contemporary lives possible. The fires cut road access, which meant towns ran out of fuel and fell low on food. Power to towns was cut and mobile phone services
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Credit: Cromo Digital/Shutterstock The concentration of growth in major cities, driven by the knowledge economy and the changing nature of work, may also increase their social inequality. Our research looked at cities in the US and Australia. We compared measures of the knowledge economy and social vulnerability of their metropolitan areas and plotted them together.
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Credit: City University London A new report by Cass Business School and the International Longevity Centre UK (ILC-UK), reveals that longer lives and lower birth rates are putting increasing strain on our family structures. The report, “100-year family: Longer lives, fewer children,” highlights how the role and resilience of UK families has changed over time,
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Italian American organized crime may conjure images of classic gangster flicks, but as James B. Jacobs explores in the Crime and Justice article “The Rise and Fall of Organized Crime in the United States,” its history is unexpectedly nuanced and mutable. The Cosa Nostra families—popularly known as the Mafia—operated, at the height of their power,
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain In a groundbreaking study, research carried out between the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and the University of Lausanne (UNIL, Switzerland) has compiled data on homicide victims in Spain, disaggregated by gender, from 1910 to 2014. Unlike previous studies, which have focused on particular regions of the country or shorter time
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Half of female Spanish researchers believe that being a woman makes your career more difficult. Furthermore, 70% of female scientists think that there are not enough female researchers in leadership roles in Spain. This is according to a report on gender equality in research published by the Society of Spanish Researchers
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Why aren’t organizations getting more “bang” for their leadership development buck? To answer that question, two leadership experts looked at the underlying processes that contribute to leaders’ decision-making and behavior: their mindsets. Christopher S. Reina, Ph.D., assistant professor of management and entrepreneurship in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Business, and
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In the last decade, thousands have been killed or injured as a result of mass violence in the United States. Such acts take many forms, including family massacres, terrorist attacks, shootings, and gang violence. Yet it is indiscriminate mass public shootings, often directed at strangers, that has generated the most public alarm. Now, 41 scholars
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain “It’s right and proper that we have policies to prevent terrorism,” says Francesco Ragazzi, university lecturer in International Relations at Leiden’s Institute of Political Science. “But the way the policies are designed and implemented can have unintended consequences. For example, when teachers are asked to report signs of radicalization.” Francesco Ragazzi
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Credit: ChameleonsEye/Shutterstock Violence committed by intimate partners is one of the most common forms of violence against women. In 2019, 6% – or one million women in the UK – reported having experienced physical, psychological, or sexual violence by a current or former partner in the last year alone. But despite its prevalence, relatively few
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Credit: North Carolina State University A representative survey of undergraduate and graduate students at North Carolina State University finds that almost 10% of students experienced homelessness in the previous year, and more than 14% of students dealt with food insecurity in the previous 30 days. The study highlights the housing and food security challenges facing
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain High-profile cases of officer brutality against black citizens in recent years have caused Americans to question the racial makeup of their police departments. Many advocates believe that diversifying these forces will help reduce police violence against people of color. My research suggests increased representation might not solve the problem. I interviewed
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Sociologist Asad L. Asad studied how documented and undocumented immigrants living in Dallas, Texas, perceive and respond to threats of deportation. Credit: Harrison Truong For some Latin American immigrants living in Dallas, Texas, holding a legal status—like a green card—does not stop them from fearing deportation. If anything, it can make some more fearful of
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Carla Handley meeting with the Turkana community. Credit: Carla Handley It may not always seem so, but scientists are convinced that humans are unusually cooperative. Unlike other animals, we cooperate not just with kith and kin, but also with genetically unrelated strangers. Consider how often we rely on the good behavior of acquaintances and strangers—
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Rutgers researchers say gender bias and stereotypes corresponding to certain occupations are prevalent on digital and social media platforms. The study, published in the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, finds that online images of men and women in four professions—librarian, nurse, computer programmer, and civil engineer—tend to
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