Humans

Credit: CC0 Public Domain An Australian study examining the relationship between flexibility and parent health has revealed formal family-friendly workplace provisions alone are not meeting the demands of working mothers and fathers. The La Trobe University survey of more than 4,000 parents from different occupations found 86 per cent relied on additional informal ‘catch-up’ strategies
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain February 1st marks the start of Black History Month. While many people are familiar with iconic figures such as Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman, there are many other lesser known African-Americans, whose achievements should also be recognized. Black Quotidian—an archive of digitized African-American newspaper content, introduces audiences
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In Tunis, during the Jasmine Revolution (June 2011), rap was the way to spread unrest with Ben Ali’s authoritarian regime. Credit: Photo taken in Tunisia by the authors. Songs that Sing the Crisis: Music, Words, Youth Narratives and Identities in Late Modernity is the title of a special issue of the journal Young (Nordic Journal
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Something is rotten in the state of American political life. The U.S. (among other nations) is increasingly characterized by highly polarized, informationally insulated ideological communities occupying their own factual universes. Within the conservative political blogosphere, global warming is either a hoax or so uncertain as to be unworthy of response. Within other geographic or online
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Credit: Drew Beamer via Unsplash Most students are familiar with their university’s chancellor or president. But what about the people who make up their school’s board of trustees? Boards of trustees are the governing bodies behind many universities and university systems. Although they often operate in relative anonymity, the decisions they make can have far-reaching
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain How people visualize God can have real consequences to life on Earth, Stanford research has found. The researchers, led by Stanford psychologist Steven O. Roberts, conducted a series of studies with U.S. Christians and found that when people conceptualize God as a white man, they are more likely to perceive white
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There is plenty of data showing that police brutality leads to mistrust of police and law enforcement. Researchers from Lehigh University and the University of Minnesota set out to see if experience with police brutality might affect health by causing mistrust in medical institutions. Through an analysis of data gleaned from a survey of 4,000
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Branden Bouchillon. Credit: University of Arkansas Role-playing the administrative experiences of immigrants led students to empathize and trust them, according to a new study by two University of Arkansas researchers. Brandon Bouchillon, assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Strategic Media, and Patrick Stewart, associate professor in the Department of Political Science, created a role-playing experience for
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A total of 374 people took part in this activity, which was carried out in FiraTàrrega 2017, an international performing arts market. Credit: OpenSystems/UB Researchers from the UB published an article in the journal Scientific Reports which analyses, through the prisoner’s dilemma game, the willingness of people to cooperate when in pairs. A total of
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain British newspapers are routinely glamorising combat by creating a moral separation between combat and non-combat injuries, according to new research published in the journal Media, War and Conflict. Academics from Anglia Ruskin University’s Veterans and Families Institute for Military Social Research (VFI) examined the reporting of injuries sustained by British military
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Despite an ever-rising number of pedestrian and bicyclist deaths on U.S. roads each year, there’s no widespread public pressure to improve road safety—a situation influenced by how news articles about auto-pedestrian/bicyclist crashes are written, said Tara Goddard, Texas A&M assistant professor of urban planning. “Adopting simple improvements in crash reporting offers a potentially powerful tool
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Penn doctoral student David Yaden practices mindfulness, a simple habit he uses to re-center himself after stressful situations. It’s also one that’s backed by science, having been analyzed and written about for decades. The same is true for yoga, another intervention borne out of a religious practice that has become mainstream.
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Credit: Chart: The Conversation, CC-BY-ND Source: General Social Survey Get the data You don’t have to look hard to see uncivil behavior these days, whether in political discourse, in college classrooms or on airplanes. One study found that rudeness is even contagious, like the common cold. The workplace, where my research is focused, is hardly
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain A ‘Big Brother’ data culture in rugby driven by performance management threatens to create heightened distrust, anxiety and insecurity among players, according to a new study. The qualitative research, based on interviews with 10 players, coaches and analysts at an English Premiership club, suggests that data culture in the professional game
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