Humans

Credit: CC0 Public Domain After the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Facebook began putting warning tags on news stories fact-checkers judged to be false. But there’s a catch: Tagging some stories as false makes readers more willing to believe other stories and share them with friends, even if those additional, untagged stories also turn out to
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Since the 2016 U.S. presidential election, debates have raged about the reach of so-called “fake news” websites and the role they played during the campaign. A study published in Nature Human Behaviour finds that the reach of these untrustworthy websites has been overstated. To assess the audience for “fake news,” researchers
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Credit: Vastram/Shutterstock.com The British supermarket chain Morrisons recently announced that it will only sell free range eggs. This is a telltale example of how business and government are starting to do more to encourage or require ethical consumption in the UK. The government recently announced that solid coal and wet wood can no longer be
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The researchers simulated the complex cultural creation of a plant-based medicinal product. Credit: UZH Humans began developing a complex culture as early as the Stone Age. This development was brought about by social interactions between various groups of hunters and gatherers, a UZH study has now confirmed. The researchers mapped the social networks of present-day
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Credit: AVA Bitter via Shutterstock In 2019, there were 1.4 billion international tourist arrivals globally—and, given that the planet only holds 7.7 billion humans, this figure alone suggests that a lot of us are traveling. The World Tourism Organization reports two major motivations for this—”travel to change”: the quest for local experiences, authenticity, transformation and
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Income inequality may be linked to how often people French kiss, according to a worldwide study by Abertay University. The cross-cultural research involved 2,300 participants from 13 different countries across six continents. Respondents answered a range of questions including how often they French kissed their partner, and how important they thought
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Conspiracies abound in society and can have real world impacts when it leads some people to act, whether that means becoming more engaged politically, or less engaged. Previous research linking conspiracy beliefs and political actions provide mixed results. Some studies show people with a conspiracy worldview are more likely to disengage politically, while others show
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‘All of us had some sort of experience [with crime], personally or through family members. And we thought maybe we can do something about it,’ said Hessam Sadatsafavi, PhD, of the University of Virginia School of Medicine. Credit: Dan Addison | UVA Communications Properly designed and maintained outdoor green space has the potential to reduce
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Credit: Andrey_Popov/Shutterstock Facial recognition is increasingly being used in many countries around the world. In some cases the take up has been dramatic. As a result, people are being observed by cameras more than ever, whether in stores, on public transit, or at their workplaces. Using this technology may seem justified when it helps law
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Negative economic news gets more coverage in newspapers than positive news and it has a greater influence on public opinion. This double asymmetry has far-reaching consequences, as evidenced by policymakers with ambitious plans. “I was certainly surprised to see that negativity is such a common thread running through everything,” said Alyt
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Credit: PeteMuller Research has shown that police are about three times more likely to kill black men compared to white men. A new University of Minnesota School of Public Health study surveyed various stakeholders to learn why they think violent encounters between law enforcement and young black men occur in their communities. The study, led
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Flashing crosswalk lights are no match for flashy cars, according to a new UNLV study which found that drivers of expensive cars are least likely to stop for crossing pedestrians. Drivers on a whole aren’t all that great at stopping for pedestrians waiting at crosswalks: Of 461 cars that researchers examined,
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain A new study exposes the fallacy of relying on pronunciation as a measure of linguistic proficiency. The study, ‘Revisiting phonetic integration in bilingual borrowing’, by Shana Poplack, Suzanne Robillard, Nathalie Dion (all from the University of Ottawa), and John. C. Paolillo (University of Indiana Bloomington) will be published in March 2020
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Credit: vchal/Shutterstock Andrew Sabisky, a UK government adviser, recently resigned over comments supporting eugenics. Around the same time, the evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins—best known for his book The Selfish Gene—provoked controversy when tweeting that while eugenics is morally deplorable, it “would work.” Eugenics can be described as the science and practice of improving the human
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