Nature

A study led by Susan Tsang, a former Fulbright Research Fellow from The City College of New York, reveals dwindling populations and widespread hunting throughout Indonesia and the Philippines of the world’s largest bats, known as flying foxes. Unfortunately, hunting not only depletes the flying foxes, which are already rare, but also potentially exposes humans
0 Comments
Seagrasses have long been known as some of Earth’s most remarkable organisms — descendants of flowering land plants that have re-colonized the ocean by developing traits that allow them to grow, pollinate, and release seeded fruits while fully immersed in salty seawater. Now, research by a joint Australian-U.S. team reveals that one group of seagrasses,
0 Comments
Governments must provide larger spatial protections in the Greater Caribbean for threatened, highly migratory species such as sharks, is the call from a diverse group of marine scientists including Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) PhD Candidate, Oliver Shipley, and led by the conservation NGO Beneath the Waves in a letter
0 Comments
A Michigan State University- and University of Maryland-led study should sound alarm bells regarding the “biodiversity crisis” or the loss of wildlife around the world. The loss of any species is devastating. However, the decline or extinction of one species can trigger an avalanche within an ecosystem, wiping out many species in the process. When
0 Comments
Future farming in regions that were previously unsuitable for agriculture could significantly impact biodiversity, water resources, and greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Lee Hannah of Conservation International’s Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science in Arlington, Virginia, and colleagues present a new analysis of these risks in the open access journal PLOS ONE. As Earth’s climate
0 Comments
Research involving the University of Liverpool has revealed the effect of climate warming on the complex interactions between tree masting and the insects that eat their seeds. Masting, the process by which trees vary the amount of seeds they produce year by year, is a characteristic of many forest tree species, including oaks, beeches, pines
0 Comments
A new approach to compensate for the impact of development may be an effective alternative to biodiversity offsetting — and help nations achieve international biodiversity targets. University of Queensland scientists say target-based ecological compensation provides greater certainty and clarity, while ensuring the management of impacts from projects like new mines, roads or housing estates directly
0 Comments
A team of scientists led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory found that while all regions of the country can expect an earlier start to the growing season as temperatures rise, the trend is likely to become more variable year-over-year in hotter regions. The researchers examined satellite imagery, air temperature data and phenology (plant life cycle}
0 Comments
For the first time, a team of marine biology and environmental genomics researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) and KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) have demonstrated that epigenetic modifications in reef-building corals can be transmitted from parents to their offspring. This discovery, reported in a new study in the journal Nature Climate
0 Comments
In the latest issue of The American Naturalist, University of Kansas investigator Jorge Soberón offers a new method for ecologists to calculate the correlation between geographic space and the number of species inhabiting that space. “There’s a problem in ecology that’s been around since the 1920s called the ‘species-area relationship,'” said Soberón, a University Distinguished
0 Comments
Rapid climate change is putting increasing pressure on marine organisms. Warming, acidification and oxygen deprivation of seawater are already causing massive changes in marine ecosystems and are likely to lead to massive species extinction by the end of the century. So which groups of animals are particularly at risk? To assess this, biology and paleontology
0 Comments