Nature

The former coalfield of Geiseltal in Saxony-Anhalt has yielded large numbers of exceptionally preserved fossil animals, giving palaeontologists a unique window into the evolution of mammals 47 million years ago. A team led by the University of Tübingen and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has shown that the body size of two species of
0 Comments
New research shows that fishes on either side of Niagara Falls — one of the most powerful waterfalls in the world — are unlikely to breed with one another. Knowing how well the falls serves as a barrier to fish movement is essential to conservation efforts to stop the spread of invasive aquatic species causing
0 Comments
When German pathologist Robert Koch discovered the bacterium behind tuberculosis in 1882, he included a short guide for linking microorganisms to the diseases they cause. It was a windfall for germ theory, the modern understanding that pathogens can make us sick. But it didn’t only shake up the field of medicine: Botanists took note, too.
0 Comments
Smithsonian Voices National Air and Space Museum Our Friend Al Who Went to the Moon: Remembering Al Worden March 23rd, 2020, 5:04PM / BY Jennifer Levasseur Al Worden visits his Apollo 15 spacesuit at the National Air and Space Museum. Al Worden, 1932-2020 Alfred “Al” Worden, command module pilot on Apollo 15, passed away on
0 Comments
Every year for the last half-century, scientists have gone to sea to collect ocean data as part of the Northern Gulf of Alaska Long Term Ecological Research Project. Now, because of the novel coronavirus, the five-decade-long project faces potential data gaps. Russell Hopcroft, project leader and oceanography professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, says
0 Comments
Giraffes that are being translocated for conservation purposes should be moved in groups that contain at least 30 females and 3 males to ensure long-term population success. In two new studies, an international team of researchers identifies the ideal composition of a group to be moved and provides guidelines for all aspects of the translocation
0 Comments
Thanks to a new algorithm, researchers at the AWI can now use satellite data to determine in which parts of the ocean certain types of phytoplankton are dominant. In addition, they can identify toxic algal blooms and assess the effects of global warming on marine plankton, allowing them to draw conclusions regarding water quality and
0 Comments
Smithsonian Voices National Museum of Natural History Seven Ways to Learn About Natural History From Home March 19th, 2020, 6:00AM / BY Margaret Osborne Insect expert Dan Babbitt talks about the Chilean Rose Tarantula on “Smithsonian Science How,” a video series for students. (Smithsonian Institution) The Smithsonian’s museums may be closed in the wake of
0 Comments
As climate change churns up extreme weather, would-be geoengineers are proposing revolutionary new technologies to minimize the effects of global warming: Reflect sunlight into space with orbiting mirrors! Absorb atmospheric carbon dioxide with artificial trees! Bulk up sea ice by cooling it with giant pumps! Even proponents acknowledge that such extravagant measures would be risky,
0 Comments