Nature

An international team of scientists led by the University of Arizona used the latest technology in remote sensing to measure plant biodiversity from the Amazon basin to the Andes Mountains in Peru to better understand how tropical forests will respond to climate change. The researchers used Arizona State University’s Global Airborne Observatory, or GAO, to
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Even single cells must sometimes be masters of disguise. Various types of harmful bacteria, for example, masquerade as human cells to evade the immune system, blanketing their surfaces with molecules that resemble our own. The clever trick effectively gives the pathogens “cloaks of invisibility,” says David Gonzalez, a biochemist and microbiologist at the University of
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New research reveals how penguins have dealt with more than a century of human impacts in Antarctica and why some species are winners or losers in this rapidly changing ecosystem. Michael Polito, assistant professor in LSU’s Department of Oceanography & Coastal Sciences and his co-authors published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy
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Humans are now closer to seeing through the eyes of animals, thanks to an innovative software framework developed by researchers from the University of Queensland and the University of Exeter. PhD candidate Cedric van den Berg from UQ’s School of Biological Sciences said that, until now, it has been difficult to understand how animals really
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In a sprawling gallery of the Royal Ontario Museum, curators and technicians crowded around two large coolers that had recently arrived at the Toronto institution. Wriggling inside the containers were live sea lampreys, eel-like creatures that feed by clamping onto the bodies of other fish, puncturing through their skin with tooth-lined tongues, and sucking out
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Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) are becoming more and more popular: Whether in soup or as fries, they increasingly compete with “regular” potatoes which, surprisingly, are only distantly related. Although economically not as important as the potato world-wide, the sweet potato has a higher nutritional value and is richer in vitamins. Particularly in Asia, the crop
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Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought as current biodiversity assessments fail to take into account the long-lasting impact of abrupt land changes, a new study has warned. The study by PhD graduate Dr Martin Jung, Senior Lecturer in Geography Dr Pedram Rowhani and Professor of Conservation Science Jörn
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For the first time, scientists have developed a method to monitor carbon emissions from tropical forests at an unprecedented level of detail. The approach will provide the basis for developing a rapid and cost-effective operational carbon monitoring system, making it possible to quantify the economic cost of deforestation as forests are converted from carbon sinks
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In contrast to most other species, reef-dwelling parrotfish populations boom in the wake of severe coral bleaching. The surprise finding came when researchers led by Perth-based Dr Brett Taylor of the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) looked at fish populations in severely bleached areas of two reefs — the Great Barrier Reef in the
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Young fish can be drawn to degraded coral reefs by loudspeakers playing the sounds of healthy reefs, according to new research published today in Nature Communications. An international team of scientists from the UK’s University of Exeter and University of Bristol, and Australia’s James Cook University and Australian Institute of Marine Science, say this “acoustic
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Sharks, penguins, turtles and other seagoing species could help humans monitor the oceans by transmitting oceanographic information from electronic tags. Thousands of marine animals are tagged for a variety of research and conservation purposes, but at present the information gathered isn’t widely used to track climate change and other shifts in the oceans. Instead, monitoring
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Almost 40% of global land plant species are categorized as very rare, and these species are most at risk for extinction as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research. The findings are published in a special issue of Science Advances that coincides with the 2019 United Nations Climate Change Conference,
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