Physics

Research shows why fireflies blink in unison even though each individual insect is different. Credit: Toan Phan Northwestern University researchers have added a new dimension to the importance of diversity. For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated that certain systems with interacting entities can synchronize only if the entities within the system are different
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UV light shines on a pane of glass, coated with several layers of two-dimensional semiconductor nanoplatelets, which emits blue light. Credit: ETH Zurich / Jakub Jagielski ETH scientists have further developed QLED technology for screens. They have produced light sources that for the first time emit high-intensity light in only one direction. This reduces scattering
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Claudia Gollner and her laser system. Credit: Vienna University of Technology Terahertz radiation is used for security checks at airports, for medical examinations and also for quality checks in industry. However, radiation in the terahertz range is extremely difficult to generate. Scientists at TU Wien have now succeeded in developing a terahertz radiation source that
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Germán J. de Valcárcel Gonzalvo. Credit: Asociacion RUVID A five-country research team coordinated by Germán J. de Valcárcel Gonzalvo, Professor of Optics at the University of Valencia, has developed a new theory —the coherent master equation— that describes the behavior of pulsed lasers based on fast materials and highlights its effects of quantum coherence (the
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ORNL researchers Garrett Granroth and Fahima Islam observe data filtered through their new software, which gives researchers access to data with five times more resolution than traditional data reduction methods. Credit: ORNL/Genevieve Martin Neutron spectroscopy is an important tool for studying magnetic and thermoelectric properties in materials. But often the resolution, or the ability of
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A wall-climbing robot uses the zero-pressure difference method to form suction. Credit: Xin Li and Kaige Shi Specially designed vacuum suction units allow humans to climb walls. Scientists have developed a suction unit that can be used on rough surfaces, no matter how textured, and that has applications in the development of climbing robots and
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Schematic diagram of the charge model. The effect of electron-electron interactions is integrated by adding multiple-holon-doublon-pair basis states (right) to one-holon-doublon basis states (left). Here, black dots represent singly occupied sites. Credit: Nagoya Institute of Technology Assistant Professor Ohmura Shu and Professor Takahashi Akira of the Nagoya Institute of Technology and others have developed a
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No two leaves share the same exact vessel patterns, yet each has a consistently structured network that allows water and nutrients to be transported across its surface. Insights from physics show how vascular networks like these can evolve into a wide array of shapes and structures from a single starting point. Credit: University of Pennsylvania From veins that
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Quantum physics is moving out of the laboratory and into everyday life. Despite headline results about quantum computers solving problems impossible for classical computers, technical challenges are standing in the way of getting quantum physics into the real world. New research published in Nature Communications from teams at Aalto University and
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Terahertz radiation is used to analyze the material. Credit: TU Wien In a new study, U.S. and Austrian physicists have observed quantum entanglement among “billions of billions” of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material. The research, which appears this week in Science, examined the electronic and magnetic behavior of a “strange metal” compound of
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Credit: Ames Laboratory Experimental physicists have combined several measurements of quantum materials into one in their ongoing quest to learn more about manipulating and controlling the behavior of them for possible applications. They even coined a term for it— Magneto-elastoresistance, or MER. Scientists in condensed matter physics at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory
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For real-time characterization of cement setting, the researchers combined diffuse reflection measurements with an optical model. Credit: José Ortiz-Lozano Researchers have developed a nondestructive and noninvasive optical technique that can determine the setting times for various types of cement paste, which is used to bind new and old concrete surfaces. The new method could aid
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Design of InGaN NCSEL diodes operating in the green wavelength. (A) Schematic of the InGaN nanocrystal arrays for the surface-emitting laser diode. (B) The diameter and lattice constant of the nanocrystals denoted as d and a, respectively. (C) Schematic of the InGaN/AlGaN nanowire heterostructure, which consists of an n-GaN cladding layer, a core-shell InGaN/AlGaN multiple
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Writing in Nature, researchers describe the first-time observation of ‘self-organized criticality’ in a controlled laboratory experiment. Complex systems exist in mathematics and physics, but also occur in nature and society. The concept of self-organized criticality claims that without external input, complex systems in non-equilibrium tend to develop into a critical state
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The name ‘quantum dots’ is given to particles of semiconducting materials that are so tiny—a few nanometres in diameter—that they no longer behave quite like ordinary, macroscopic matter. Thanks to their quantum-like optical and electronic properties, they are showing promise as components of quantum computing devices, but these properties are not yet fully understood. Physicists
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