Physics

Intracavity optical trapping. The trapping optics (collimators C1 and C2, lenses L1 and L2) are placed within the cavity of a ring fiber laser (whose direction is indicated by the red arrows) so that the position of the particle can influence the cavity loss. a When the particle is not in the trap region, the
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The Advanced Photoinjector EXperiment (APEX) and test beamline at Berkeley Lab, pictured here in 2016, served as a prototype for the LCLS-II X-ray laser upgrade project. Credit: Roy Kaltschmidt/Berkeley Lab The successful test of the LCLS-II electron gun (see related article) marks the culmination of an R&D effort spanning more than a decade at the
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Nothing lasts forever. Humans, planets, stars, galaxies, maybe even the Universe itself, everything has an expiration date. But things in the quantum realm don’t always follow the rules. Now, scientists have found that quasiparticles in quantum systems could be effectively immortal. That doesn’t mean they don’t decay, which is reassuring. But once these quasiparticles have
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A new superconducting magnet has briefly sustained an astonishing 45.5 tesla magnetic field intensity. For comparison, your flimsy fridge magnets have about 1 percent of a single tesla. The measurement, achieved by researchers at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (MagLab) at Florida State University resets the bar on what’s possible in direct current magnetic
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New research has revealed a previously unknown source of magnetism deep within our planet’s stupidly hot, squishy layers. Far from being magnetically dead, some of Earth’s mantle might have pockets of iron oxide (Fe2O3) with enough magnetic pull to have a real effect. A research team made up of scientists from around the globe has
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The famous cat-in-a-box thought experiment by Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger is an illustration of one of the defining characteristics of quantum mechanics – the unpredictable behaviour of particles at the quantum level. It makes working with quantum systems incredibly difficult; but what if we could make quantum predictions? A team of physicists believes it’s possible.
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A lab-created analogue of a black hole has provided new evidence that these mysterious space objects really do emit radiation. This evidence is indirect: physicists have shown that the analogue has a temperature, which is a necessary prerequisite for the eponymous radiation predicted by Stephen Hawking. Under general relativity, a black hole is inescapable. Its
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