It has been called Australia’s “black summer”—nearly six months of devastating bushfires that raged across the country, burning through more than 11 million hectares of land, causing the deaths of at least 33 people, and killing an estimated one billion animals. But on Thursday, fire officials took to Twitter with some good news: After days
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A study led by Susan Tsang, a former Fulbright Research Fellow from The City College of New York, reveals dwindling populations and widespread hunting throughout Indonesia and the Philippines of the world’s largest bats, known as flying foxes. Unfortunately, hunting not only depletes the flying foxes, which are already rare, but also potentially exposes humans
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WASHINGTON — DirecTV’s Spaceway-1 satellite has been retired to a graveyard orbit 500 kilometers above the geostationary arc, eliminating the risk of the malfunctioning satellite exploding in an orbit populated by active satellites.  Ground-based observations from ExoAnalytic Solutions’ network of space surveillance telescopes show that Spaceway-1 has been moved out of harm’s way and deactivated. 
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The Golden Age of Athens is long over. But thanks to photographer-animator Dimitris Tsalkanis, you can still stroll through the ancient city during its most prosperous time—at least in digital form. A native of Greece’s (modern) capital, Tsalkanis has spent the past 13 years recreating the long-gone chapters of Athens’ history with 3-D modeling software,
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Mass migrations of people in Guatemala and Honduras – partially driven by political instability, but also driven by drought-related conditions and changes in seasonality are creating enormous problems for agricultural production and feeding a growing population. Credit: Keith Prufer, UNM Research by an international team of scientists led by University of New Mexico Professor Yemane
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Dinosaur nesting site in Alberta, Canada. Credit: Darla Zelenitsky From the time that dinosaur fossils were first discovered, these creatures have fascinated scientists and laypeople alike. In the academic world, their remains provide important clues into the prehistoric world; in popular culture, dinosaurs have inspired blockbuster hits, such as Jurassic Park and King Kong. Now,
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Nora Carlson records a black-capped chickadee. She arrived at the University of Montana with an undergraduate degree in linguistics and the desire to translate bioacoustics. The nuthatch paper sprang from her UM senior thesis. Credit: University of Montana Every social network has its fake news. And in animal communication networks, even birds discern the trustworthiness
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Coral reefs account for one-third of all biodiversity in the oceans and are vital to humanity. But long-standing human stressors including agricultural run-off and overfishing and more recent ocean warming from climate change have all contributed to large-scale coral reef die-offs. “Coral reef ecosystems now appear to be unraveling before our
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Seagrasses have long been known as some of Earth’s most remarkable organisms — descendants of flowering land plants that have re-colonized the ocean by developing traits that allow them to grow, pollinate, and release seeded fruits while fully immersed in salty seawater. Now, research by a joint Australian-U.S. team reveals that one group of seagrasses,
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Yale-affiliated scientist finds that even a few hours’ exposure to ambient ultrafine particles common in air pollution may potentially trigger a nonfatal heart attack. Myocardial infarction is a major form of cardiovascular disease worldwide. Ultrafine particles (UFP) are 100 nanometers or smaller in size. In urban areas, automobile emissions are the primary source of UFP.
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The pioneer transcription factor Oct4 (blue) binds to the nucleosome (a complex of proteins (green) and the DNA (orange) wrapped around these proteins). Credit: Jan Huertas and Vlad Cojocaru, ©MPI Münster, ©Hubrecht Institute Researchers from the group of Vlad Cojocaru together with colleagues the Max Planck Institute in Münster (Germany) have revealed how an essential
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