Science

In a series of flights during NASA’s ACT-America campaign, Penn State researchers measured methane plumes in the atmosphere over portions of south central US. The researchers found measurements of methane emissions from the oil and natural gas industry are higher than EPA estimates. Credit: David Kubarek, Penn State Approximately twice as much methane is seeping
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WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine expressed reservations Jan. 27 about a NASA authorization bill introduced in the House last week that he fears could constrain the agency’s approach to human space exploration. Bridenstine’s concerns about the NASA authorization act, introduced Jan. 24 by the bipartisan leadership of the House Science Committee and its space
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Map of KAZA. Credit: Simon Dures Conservationists should be wary of assuming that genetic diversity loss in wildlife is always caused by humans, as new research published today by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) reveals that, in the case of a population of southern African lions (Panthera leo), it’s likely caused by
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SAN FRANCISCO – EOS Defense Systems USA, a subsidiary of Electro Optic Systems Holdings Ltd. of Australia, plans to establish a space-based communications relay network with Audacy’s spectrum license.EOS Defense Systems plans to pay approximately $10 million Australian dollars (about $6.76 U.S. dollars) to acquire Audacy’s business, assets and license. The Huntsville, Alabama, firm has
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This image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Tarantula Nebula in two wavelengths of infrared light. The red regions indicate the presence of particularly hot gas, while the blue regions are interstellar dust that is similar in composition to ash from coal or wood-burning fires on Earth. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech The Tarantula Nebula, seen in
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain A ‘Big Brother’ data culture in rugby driven by performance management threatens to create heightened distrust, anxiety and insecurity among players, according to a new study. The qualitative research, based on interviews with 10 players, coaches and analysts at an English Premiership club, suggests that data culture in the professional game
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Image courtesy of Cahokia Mounds Historic State Site. Painting by William R. Iseminger. A University of California, Berkeley, archaeologist has dug up ancient human feces, among other demographic clues, to challenge the narrative around the legendary demise of Cahokia, North America’s most iconic pre-Columbian metropolis. In its heyday in the 1100s, Cahokia—located in what is
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On January 27 at 4:05 a.m. EST (0905 UTC), the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the remnant clouds of former Tropical Cyclone Esami in the Southern Indian Ocean. Credit: NASA/NRL Tropical Cyclone Esami formed in the Southern Indian Ocean and just three days later, visible imagery from NASA’s Aqua
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To enter into the cell nucleus (grey), the polymersomes (red) must selectively translocate across the nuclear membrane (dark blue) via the nuclear pore complexes (gaps in the membrane). Credit: Christina Zelmer, University of Basel, and Evi Bieler, Swiss Nanoscience Institute. An interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel in Switzerland has succeeded in creating a
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Cutting emissions of particular gases could improve conditions for plants, allowing them to grow faster and capture more carbon, new research suggests. A cocktail of gases — including nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and methane — combines in the atmosphere to form ozone. Ozone at the Earth’s surface limits photosynthesis, reducing plants’ ability
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A neural network-driven Earth system model has led University of California, Irvine oceanographers to a surprising conclusion: phytoplankton populations will grow in low-latitude waters by the end of the 21st century. The unexpected simulation outcome runs counter to the longstanding belief by many in the environmental science community that future global climate change will make
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About about 145 million to 200 million years ago during the Jurassic Period, Earth’s creatures had to contend with one of the most powerful, ferocious predators that ever lived—a clawed, flesh-eating, sharp-toothed behemoth of a dinosaur that stalked the floodplains of what would become Western North America. Despite what Hollywood might have you think, we’re
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Martha Sudermann, right, and Chris Peritore-Galve, graduate students in the lab of plant pathology and plant microbe biology professor Chris Smart, examine tomatoes growing in a greenhouse at Cornell AgriTech in Geneva. Credit: Allison Usavage/Cornell University Many New York tomato growers are familiar with the scourge of bacterial canker—the wilted leaves and blistered fruit that
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For nearly a week, a series of earthquakes have been shaking the area around Grindavik, not far from the steaming waters of the “Blue Lagoon,” a popular geothermal spa in southwestern Iceland on the Reykjanes Peninsula Small earthquakes and a so-called “inflation” of the mountain, signalling a potential volcanic eruption, have been reported near Iceland’s
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