TOKYO (Reuters) – Newly released data from a Japanese research institute appears to back the government’s case that its quarantine strategy for the Diamond Princess cruise ship was successful in stemming contagion of the coronavirus among passengers. Japan has been criticised for its handling of the quarantine, as more than 620 people on board have
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain The ALPHA collaboration at CERN has reported the first measurements of certain quantum effects in the energy structure of antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of hydrogen. These quantum effects are known to exist in matter, and studying them could reveal as yet unobserved differences between the behavior of matter and antimatter. The
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The European Union unveiled proposals Wednesday to regulate artificial intelligence that call for strict rules and safeguards on risky applications of the rapidly developing technology. The report is part of the bloc’s wider digital strategy aimed at maintaining its position as the global pacesetter on technological standards. Big tech companies seeking to tap Europe’s vast
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The “United States Space Force Vision for Satellite Communications” calls for an integrated network of commercial and military satcom services. WASHINGTON — The U.S. Space Force on Feb. 19 unveiled a plan to change how it acquires satellite-based communications for the Defense Department. The essence of the plan is to combine military and commercial satcom
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Credit: University of Cambridge By watching videos of each other eating, blue tits and great tits can learn to avoid foods that taste disgusting and are potentially toxic, a new study has found. Seeing the ‘disgust response’ in others helps them recognise distasteful prey by their conspicuous markings without having to taste them, and this
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WASHINGTON — Lockheed Martin says it lost $410 million on the first three commercial satellites built on its new LM2100 platform, including the JCSAT-17 satellite Arianespace launched Feb. 18 on an Ariane 5 rocket. The other two commercial satellites built at a loss were Arabsat-6A and SaudiGeoSat-1/Hellas Sat-4, two Arabsat spacecraft that launched last year
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain Russia’s space agency said Wednesday that two cosmonauts scheduled to launch to the International Space Station will be replaced with alternates for medical reasons. Roscosmos said crew members Nikolai Tikhonov and Andrei Babkin will be replaced by their designated backups, Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner, for the launch scheduled for April
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Following stories of dragons, naturalist Janez Vajkard Valvasor traveled to Vrhnika, a town now in Slovenia, in 1689. After heavy rainfall, animals resembling baby dragons were swept out of nearby caves; could this be evidence that a mama dragon was lurking inside, perhaps? Not quite. Those baby dragons were actually olm salamanders, which max out
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Astronaut Michael Foale sampling the potable water delivery system from the International Space Station. Credit: CC0 (public domain), NASA Two particularly tenacious species of bacteria have colonized the potable water dispenser aboard the International Space Station (ISS), but a new study suggests that they are no more dangerous than closely related strains on Earth. Aubrie
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Credit: CC0 Public Domain To develop futuristic technologies like quantum computers, scientists will need to find ways to control photons, the basic particles of light, just as precisely as they can already control electrons, the basic particles in electronic computing. Unfortunately, photons are far more difficult to manipulate than electrons, which respond to forces as
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Last month, the International Union of Geological Sciences formally adopted the name “Chibanian Age” for the period between 770,000 and 126,000 years ago, Kyodo News reported at the time. The beginning of the period is defined by the most recent reversal of Earth’s magnetic field, called the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal. The flip took about 22,000 years
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First deployment of an earlier version of the Ice-tethered acoustic Buoy (ITAB), March 2017. Credit: U.S. Navy U.S. Naval Research Laboratory scientists developed Ice-tethered Acoustic Buoys to monitor the acoustic and oceanographic environment in the changing Arctic. The buoys provide critical oceanographic data to improve prediction capabilities of ocean and climate models. These buoys validated
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Luis Martinez-Lemus (right) discusses research findings with Lauren Park (left) and Jaume Padilla at the University of Missouri’s Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center. Credit: University of Missouri First be a human, then be a scientist. As social beliefs and values change over time, scientists have struggled with effectively communicating the facts of their research with the
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